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Carmel’s Portuguese Delight
Carmel’s Portuguese Delight Yonatan Sternberg
After aging for 18 months in French oak barrels, deep and impenetrable purple in color, this medium-full bodied Port suggests aromas of berries and a hint of dark chocolate. Similar to the nose the wine comes on with a pleasant sweetness and a touch of dried fruits.
Port is a sweet fortified wine from the Douro Valley located in the north of Portugal.
Port received its name from the city of Oporto which is situated on the mouth of the 560-mile long Rio Douro (“River of Gold”). Similar to the laws regarding the production of Champagne, the strict usage of the terms Port or Porto refer only to wines produced in Portugal.

A little bit of history:

In 1678 Britain declared war on France and blockaded French Ports. Since the British wine drinkers were mostly dependent on French wine, the Britons were forced to search for other sources to saturate their thirst.

In 1703 Britain and Portugal signed the Methuen Treaty. This treaty included a specific article referring to Port wine export/import. The terms of the treaty stated that Portuguese wines imported into England would be subject to substantial tax breaks. In return exports of English woolen cloth would be admitted into Portugal free of duty.
During the long journey from Portugal to England the wine would often spoil. To that end, the winemakers began fortifying the wine in order to prolong its shelf life and ensure that the Port will arrive in tact.

The continued British involvement in the Port trade can be seen to this day in the names of many Port shippers including: Cockburn, Graham, Osborne, Sandeman, Taylor and others.

The following is a port style wine produced by the Carmel winery:

Name: Carmel Vintage, 2004
Region: Judean Hills
Variety: Petite-Sirah
Price: NIS 140

Tasting Notes:

After aging for 18 months in French oak barrels, deep and impenetrable purple in color, this medium-full bodied Port suggests aromas of berries and a hint of dark chocolate. Similar to the nose the wine comes on with a pleasant sweetness and a touch of dried fruits.

Matching Port with food

Port can be served as a desert wine, aperitif or even as a digestif. Probably the most common match for Port wine is the Stilton blue cheese.

The richness of the wine is enhanced when serving it alongside nuts, dried fruit, potent cheeses, pat? de fois gras (goose liver), and dark chocolate.

Tip of the week:

The ultimate serving temperature varies with the type of Port.

Make sure you serve the Port at the right temperature, if served too warm, the taste of the alcohol can be overwhelming.



( Picture “wine maker Lior Laxer” )

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