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Giving Hope
Giving Hope Yonatan Sternberg
“Produced using Syrah grapes from the Kfar Yuval vineyard and blended with a small amount of Cabernet Sauvignon this medium to full bodied red is reflecting the 14 months spent in oak. On the nose and palate the wine is showing plenty of black and red berry fruits, dark plums and hints of vanilla and wood…” Yonatan Sternberg admires the Tulip Winery in Israel for both their products and their community service.
Established in 2003 by the Itzhaki family, the Tulip Winery is situated in “Kfar Tikva” (the village of hope) adjacent to Kiryat Tivon. Kfar Tikva is a unique community in which people with disabilities and special needs can develop and realize their potential. The winery has become an integral part of the village and currently employs several members of the community, providing them with an opportunity to take part in the growing Israeli wine industry.

This medium size winery currently produces 85,000 bottles annually which are intended both for export as well as for the local market. Tulip draws grapes from several different vineyards including: Kfar Yuval and Alma vineyards which are situated in the northern part of the country and the Karmei Yosef and Mata vineyards located in the Judean Hills.

At a recent wine tasting I sampled one of the winery’s reds, the Syrah reserve 2005.

Tulip, Reserve, Syrah, 2005

Tasting notes:
Produced using Syrah grapes from the Kfar Yuval vineyard and blended with a small amount of Cabernet Sauvignon this medium to full bodied red is reflecting the 14 months spent in oak. On the nose and palate the wine is showing plenty of black and red berry fruits, dark plums and hints of vanilla and wood.

Food pairing:
The wine should go well with juicy grilled meats, particularly grilled beef. Another option would be to serve this red alongside a platter of quality cheeses and a fresh baguette.


Tip of the week: Rogov’s Guide to Israeli Wines

I don’t always have the benefit of tasting the wine before I purchase a bottle; hence I usually look on line or check in the wine guides to have a reference point. It is important to remember that the scores in the various guides don’t necessarily mean the wine will be to your likings, at the end of the day your taste is the one that counts.

My favorite Israeli wine guide is Rogov’s Guide to Israeli Wines. This convenient pocket size guide offers a snapshot of the Israeli wine industry. The guide includes detailed information on Israel’s wine regions and grape varieties; coverage of over 160 wineries, almost 1,500 wines tasted, rated and described in detail and more...



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